You are here

InfoWorld

Subscribe to InfoWorld feed InfoWorld
Updated: 7 min 31 sec ago

What’s new in the F# programming language

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 15:30

In mid-August 2018, Microsoft released the production Version 4.5 of F#, which supports the Span value type from .Net Core to improve code.

[ Get started with functional programming, including examples in F#. • Discover 14 excellent reasons to use F#. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]Current version: What’s new in F# 4.5

Span, aka Span<T>, enables the representation of contiguous regions in arbitrary memory. With Span, Microsoft wants F# to have better code generation particularly for byref-like constructions and full parity with .Net Core performance innovations. Interoperability with high-performance code also is a goal.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

For cloud deployments, ‘it works’ is not good enough

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 06:00

“It works.” That’s a term used to go right along with “success,” but these days it means that you’ve gotten an instance of a cloud solution up and running. But it’s typically falling short in some way that those that use the term “it works” don’t yet understand.

Why? If you have an IT problem to solve using cloud computing technology, there are about 5! (five factorial) solutions, and they all “work.” However, only one solution pattern and corresponding technology solution are the most optimal.

[ InfoWorld explains: What is cloud-native? The modern way to develop software. | Get started: Azure cloud migration guide. • Tutorial: Get started with Google Cloud. | Keep up with the latest developments in cloud computing with InfoWorld’s Cloud Computing newsletter. ]

So, you can have something working, but it’s costing you $1 million a month in lost efficiency. Yet those who crafted the solution are marveling at the fact that it’s functioning—and are typically unaware of the lost value that they created. Nobody bothers to figure it out, so they move forward with a suboptimal solution, money is lost, and the business is worse off.

To read this article in full, please click here

Categories: News

Machine learning: How to create a recommendation engine

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 06:00

What do Russian trolls, Facebook, and US elections have to do with machine learning? Recommendation engines are at the heart of the central feedback loop of social networks and the user-generated content (UGC) they create. Users join the network and are recommended users and content with which to engage. Recommendation engines can be gamed because they amplify the effects of thought bubbles. The 2016 US presidential election showed how important it is to understand how recommendation engines work and the limitations and strengths they offer.

AI-based systems aren’t a panacea that only creates good things; rather, they offer a set of capabilities. It can be incredibly useful to get an appropriate product recommendation on a shopping site, but it can be equally frustrating to get recommended content that later turns out to be fake (perhaps generated by a foreign power motivated to sow discord in your country).

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

Interview: Brendan Eich on JavaScript’s blessing and curse

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 06:00

Being the creator of JavaScript has been a blessing and a curse for Brendan Eich. On the one hand, JavaScript has the distinction of being the most popular programming language in the world. On the other, no language has been the target of more snark.

Eich is well aware of the language’s drawbacks—after all, in 1995, he worked around the clock to create JavaScript in a mere 10 days. In this lively interview with IDG’s Eric Knorr, Eich readily admits to JavaScript’s flaws and talks frankly about what he might have done better, while touching on JavaScript’s improvements over its 23-year lifespan. Warts and all, JavaScript has indeed become “the assembly language of the web.”

To read this article in full, please click here

Categories: News

Oracle and Intel seek to build a Java API for SIMD support

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 17:00

Oracle and Intel are developing a Java API to add first-class vector, or SIMD (single instruction, multiple data), support to the platform, which could yield big performance gains.  

Part of Project Panama, which focuses on interconnecting JVM and native code, the API aims to provide an initial iteration of an incubator module, jdk.incubator.vector, to express vector computations that compile at runtime to optimal hardware instructions on supported CPU architectures. Plans call for support of the Graal compiler. Goals of the project include:

To read this article in full, please click here

Categories: News

Introducing the Kubernetes Operator for TiDB

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 06:00

Shuan Deng and Greg Weber are cloud product engineers at PingCAP.

The rise of Kubernetes has significantly simplified the deployment and operation of cloud-native applications. An important part of that experience is the ease of running a cloud-native distributed database like TiDB. TiDB is an open-source, MySQL-compatible “NewSQL” database that supports hybrid transactional and analytical processing (HTAP).

In this tutorial, we’ll discuss how to use the TiDB Operator, a new open-source project by PingCAP to leverage Kubernetes to deploy the entire TiDB Platform and all of its components. The TiDB Operator allows you to monitor a TiDB deployment in a Kubernetes cluster and provides a gateway to administrative duties.

To read this article in full, please click here

Categories: News

Why there are no shortcuts to machine learning

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 06:00

Big data remains a game for the 1 percent. Or the 15 percent, as new O’Reilly survey data suggests. According to the survey, most enterprises (85 percent) still haven’t cracked the code on AI and machine learning. A mere 15 percent “sophisticated” enterprises have been running models in production for more than five years. Importantly, these same companies tend to give more time and attention to critical areas like model bias and data privacy, whereas comparative newbies are still trying to find the On button.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

What’s new in Microsoft’s Visual Studio 2017

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 19:00

Microsoft has released the production version of Visual Studio 2017 15.8, which offers a unified Docker container experience.

Where to download Visual Studio

You can download Visual Studio 15.8 from the Visual Studio website.

[ Review: Visual Studio 2017 is the best ever. | Get started with Visual Studio Code, Microsoft’s lightweight editor for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. • Learn what’s new in the latest version of Visual Studio Code. ]Current version: What’s new in Visual Studio 15.8

In Version 15.8, a single project Docker container experience is offered for ASP.Net Core web projects. This builds on the existing Docker container tools to simplify the building and debugging of Docker containers from the IDE. Developers can add Docker support when starting a project or add it to an existing project.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

Oracle offers GraphPipe spec for machine learning data transmission

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 12:00

Oracle has developed an open source specification for transmitting tensor data, which the company wants to become a standard for machine learning.

Called GraphPipe, the specification provides a protocol for network data transmission. GraphPipe is intended to bring the efficiency of a binary, memory-mapped format while being simple and light on dependencies. There also are clients and servers for deploying and querying machine learning models from any framework.

It includes:

  • A set of flatbuffer definitions. Flatbuffers are similar to Google protocol buffers, with an additional benefit of avoiding memory copy during deserialization. Flatbuffer definitions provide a request message that includes input, tensors, input names, and output names.
  • Guidelines for serving models.
  • Examples of serving models from various machine learning frameworks.
  • Client libraries for querying models served through GraphPipe. Clients are available for Python, Go, and Java. There’s a plugin for Google’s TensorFlow library, for including a remote model inside a local TensorFlow graph.

With GraphPipe, a remote model accepts a request message and returns one tensor per output name. The model also provides metadata about types and shapes of inputs and outputs. 

To read this article in full, please click here

Categories: News

Cloud computing 2018: How enterprise adoption is taking shape

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 06:00

A 2018 cloud computing study by IDG Communications, InfoWorld’s parent company, has found that organizations continue to increase their investment and evolve their cloud environments to leverage the technology to drive their business forward. With 73 percent of the 550 surveyed organizations having at least one application, or a portion of their computing infrastructure already in the cloud, it is no longer a question of if organizations will adopt cloud, but how.

The study discovered several key trends about the how of enterprise cloud adoption, including reduced concerns over cloud providers’ security, the increasing complexity of cloud deployments, and the increase in as-a-service deployment thinking.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

Review: 13 Python web frameworks compared

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 06:00

If you are developing a web application and you have picked Python as the language to build it in, that’s a smart move. Python’s maturity of development, robust libraries, and breadth of real-world adoption have helped make it a no-brainer for web development.

Now comes the hard part: Picking one of the many Python web frameworks available. It’s not only that the number keeps growing, but it can be hard to find the one that best fits your use case. If you’re constructing a quick-and-dirty REST API, you won’t need anywhere near the plumbing and wiring required for a full user-facing application with user logins, form validations, and upload handling.

[ What is Python? Everything you need to know. • Tutorial: How to get started with Python. • 6 essential libraries for every Python developer. • Why you should use Python for machine learning. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]Related video: Why Python makes programming easy

In this roundup, we’ll examine 13 of the most widely deployed Python web frameworks. We’ll note what kinds of web applications each is best suited to building and look into how they stack up against one another in these six areas:

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

What’s new in Microsoft Visual Studio Code

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 19:50

Microsoft’s open source development tool is an important piece of the developer’s toolkit. Built using GitHub’s cross-platform Electron framework, Visual Studio Code is a full-featured development editor that supports a wide selection of languages and platforms, from the familiar C and C# to modern environments and languages like Go and Node.js, with parity between Windows, MacOS, and Linux releases.

Microsoft regularly updates Visual Studio Code. Keep track of the updates’ key features in this changelog.

[ Get started with Visual Studio Code, Microsoft’s lightweight editor for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. • Discover Microsoft’s feature roadmap for Visual Studio Code. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]Where to download Visual Studio Code

To download the editor for Windows, MacOS, and Linux, go to Microsoft’s Visual Code Studio website. It’s also available in Anaconda Python as an option in Distribution 51.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

Introducing MSIX, the one installer for all Windows apps

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 06:00

Building installers on Windows used to be complicated. It all depended on which installation tool were you using and how was your code being distributed. Could you wrap an executable around a Zip file, or use the venerable XCOPY? Things got simpler when Microsoft introduced the Windows Installer, and its standard MSI format.

The arrival of the Windows Store and a whole new app model in Windows 8 changed things. As a result, there were two ways of deploying code, and two different ways code could run. MSI apps remained the default for desktop, while the new APPX format was required for Windows Store apps. Windows Store apps also ran in a different context from desktop apps, with a new sandbox that reduced the risk of malware compromising systems.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

The cloud will soon drive your car

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 06:00

I’m a car guy. I’m also a cloud guy. So, it is natural I would want to connect the two. But it’s not just me. In fact, the car-cloud connection is already happening.

Cars have been pretty stupid in the past, even with all of the computerization and automation that has come in recent model cars. They still can’t diagnose and fix themselves. Most cannot drive without a person controlling them. And, worst of all, they offer pretty complex features that many drivers can’t understand, and thus can’t use.

[ Learn all about the cloud at InfoWorld. Start with the basics: What is cloud computing? Everything you need to know now. Then learn what is IaaS (infrastructure as a service), what is PaaS (platform as a service), and what is SaaS (software as a service). | Get ready for the latest trend in cloud computing: What is multicloud? The next step in cloud computing. ]

Over the last several years, cars have been more and more software-defined; Tesla is the best-kown example. We now have automobile capabilities that can be downloaded and installed, such as to provide added range or self-driving capabilities. You just have to look at who is entering the auto game—technology companies such as Apple and Google. We’ll be driving tech, not just vehicles.  

To read this article in full, please click here

Categories: News

Vue JavaScript CLI tool gets a rewrite

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 17:00

Vue CLI, which provides a standard build tool chain for applications built with the Vue JavaScript framework, has been rewritten in its Version 3.0 release, which debuted on August 10.

Called a “completely different beast” from its predecessor by Vue.js creator Evan You, Vue CLI 3.0 is intended to reduce configuration “fatigue” of front-end tools. Incorporating best practices in the tool chain was a goal as well.

[ Go deeper at InfoWorld: Beyond jQuery: An expert guide to JavaScript frameworks • The complete guide to Node.js frameworks • The 10 essential JavaScript developer tools • The 6 best JavaScript IDEs and 10 best JavaScript editors. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]

Vue CLI 3 provides Vue CLI projects out-of-the-box support for the following:

To read this article in full, please click here

Categories: News

Vue JavaScript CLI tool apps gets a rewrite

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 17:00

Vue CLI, which provides a standard build tool chain for applications built with the Vue JavaScript framework, has been rewritten in its Version 3.0 release, which debuted on August 10.

Called a “completely different beast” from its predecessor by Vue.js creator Evan You, Vue CLI 3.0, or Vue 3, is intended to reduce configuration “fatigue” of front-end tools. Incorporating best practices in the tool chain was a goal as well.

[ Go deeper at InfoWorld: Beyond jQuery: An expert guide to JavaScript frameworks • The complete guide to Node.js frameworks • The 10 essential JavaScript developer tools • The 6 best JavaScript IDEs and 10 best JavaScript editors. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]

Vue 3 provides Vue CLI projects out-of-the-box support for the following:

To read this article in full, please click here

Categories: News

How to work with threads in C#

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 06:00

A thread is the smallest unit of execution within a process. Multithreading is the ability to have multiple threads in memory at a given time and switch among them to handle multiple operations at the same time. Microsoft’s .Net Framework provides excellent support for working with threads.

[ Get started with Visual Studio Code, Microsoft’s lightweight editor for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. • Learn what’s new in the latest version of Visual Studio Code. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]Programming threads in C#

To work with threads, you should include the System.Threading namespace in your application. To create a new thread, you should leverage the ThreadStart delegate and pass the reference to a method that should execute on the thread. Note that a delegate is a type-safe function pointer. The following code snippet shows how you can create a new thread object using this delegate.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

15 APIs every developer should know

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 06:00

Was it Isaac Newton who said he saw further because he stood on the shoulders of giants? APIs are like pithy, epigrammatic quotes for those who write code. They let programmers see further and stand on the shoulders of giants.

Over the last decade, the development community has grown obsessed with public APIs, and the development of them continues to explode. Someone gets a good idea, writes some great code, and then decides to “ship it” by setting up a website that lets us run the code remotely. In the old days, there would have been licensing agreements, downloads, compilation issues, and endless hair-pulling in order to stand on the shoulders of giants. Now we can just post some JSON to a website and get the answer back in a fraction of a second.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

How to work with threads in C#

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 06:00

A thread is the smallest unit of execution within a process. Multithreading is the ability to have multiple threads in memory at a given time and switch among them to handle multiple operations at the same time. Microsoft’s .Net Framework provides excellent support for working with threads.

[ Get started with Visual Studio Code, Microsoft’s lightweight editor for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. • Learn what’s new in the latest version of Visual Studio Code. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]Programming threads in C#

To work with threads, you should include the System.Threading namespace in your application. To create a new thread, you should leverage the ThreadStart delegate and pass the reference to a method that should execute on the thread. Note that a delegate is a type-safe function pointer. The following code snippet shows how you can create a new thread object using this delegate.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: News

Blue Team Village, DEF CON 2018 | Salted Hash Ep 43

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 20:16
Host Steve Ragan talks to Munin, a staffer at the DEF CON Blue Team Village about what's happening and what you can expect.
Categories: News

Pages